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January 30 2018

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artemisvoice:

David Amram at the Five Spot Cafe in New York City, 1957 

Photo by Burt Glinn



The Five Spot Café was a jazz club located at 5 Cooper Square in the Bowery neighbourhood of New York City.


Description via: wikipedia: “In 1937, Salvatore Termini (b. 1884) purchased what was then known as the Bowery Café, a working-class bar located under the Third Avenue El. In 1946, two of Termini’s sons, Joe and Ignatze (Iggy), returned from the war and helped run the bar. In 1951, the sons purchased the business from their father and renamed it the No. 5 Bar.

In late 1955, the Third Avenue El was demolished and the city embarked on a revitalization of the Bowery. During this time, many artists were drawn to the area due to the cheaper rent prices compared to Greenwich Village. Pianist Don Shoemaker was among the influx of artists who moved to the Bowery. Occupying a studio at 1 Cooper Square above the No. 5 Bar, Shoemaker hosted jam sessions during which he would purchase beer from the Terminis. Shoemaker eventually told Joe that if the bar would purchase a piano, he and his band would play. Joe bought a used upright piano, received a cabaret licence on 30 August 1956, and opened a week later under the name the Five Spot Café. Painters such as David Smith, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Alfred Leslie, Larry Rivers, Grace Hartigan, Jack Tworkov, Michael Goldberg, Roy Newell, Howard Kanovitz and writers Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O'Hara, Ted Joans, and Gregory Corso began to frequent the club.

Keep reading

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Painting of Autumn Moon & Grasses

Matsubayashi Keigetsu (1876-1963)



January 28 2018

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January 27 2018

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January 26 2018

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January 25 2018

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January 13 2018

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“Looking For My Father” (by Wolf Silveri)

January 12 2018

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Everywhere the great artist hears spirit answer to his spirit. Where, then, can you find a more religious man?


Does not the sculptor perform his act of adoration when he perceives the majestic character of the forms that he studies? — when, from the midst of fleeting lines, he knows how to extricate the eternal type of each being? — when he seems to discern in the very breast of the divinity the immutable models on which all living creatures are moulded? Study, for example, the masterpieces of the Egyptian sculptors, either human or animal figures, and tell me if the accentuation of the essential lines does not produce the effect of a sacred hymn. Every artist who has the gift of generalizing forms, that is to say, of accenting their logic without depriving them of their living reality, provokes the same religious emotion; for he communicates to us the thrill he himself felt before the immortal verities.


Auguste Rodin

Image: Eugène Druet  -  Auguste Rodin examining an Egyptian statue 



Artemis: See archive for more Rodin. A lot of Rodin. :)  HERE

Hopefully it all comes up in search  (problem with tags).



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The Abandoned

Artist: Auguste Rodin (French, Paris 1840–1917 Meudon)

Date: 1898–1907

Medium: Graphite

Dimensions: 7 9/16 x 11 7/8 in. (19.4 x 30.4 cm)

Credit Line: Rogers Fund, 1910

Accession Number: 10.45.20 - The Metropolitan Museum of Art


Description and image from The Metropolitan Museum of Art “Rodin began titling his drawings when he exhibited them at the 1900 Exposition Universelle. As with his sculptures, the titles remained flexible. Sometimes he appended more than one title to the same composition, enjoying the possibility of multiple meanings coexisting within a work. Other iterations of this drawing appear with inscriptions such as Psyché and Chanson de geste (epic poem).”


Artemis: See archive for more Rodin. A lot of Rodin. :)  HERE

Hopefully it all comes up in search  (problem with tags).



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Seated Nude Folding Forward, 1910-11, pencil with stump on paper. © Musée Rodin, Paris, France

Auguste Rodin


Artemis: See archive for more Rodin. A lot of Rodin. :)  HERE

Hopefully it all comes up in search  (problem with tags).



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Female nude reclining

Artist:  Auguste Rodin (French, Paris 1840–1917 Meudon)

Date: 1909–1910

Medium: Graphite

Dimensions: 9 ¼ x 14 3/16 in. (23.5 x 36.1 cm)

Credit Line: Gift of Thomas F. Ryan, 1913

Accession Number: 13.164.4 - The Metropolitan Museum of Art


Description and image from The Metropolitan Museum of ArtThis model’s ecstatic pose hints at the erotic nature of many of Rodin’s late drawings. The unselfconscious state brought on by desire and the registration of pleasure in the body appealed to the artist as part of his broader fascination with the expressivity of the female form. Rodin’s frank treatment of sexuality, particularly in his drawings, is a key aspect of his work’s modernity.


Artemis: See archive for more Rodin. A lot of Rodin. :)  HERE

Hopefully it all comes up in search  (problem with tags).



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Despair

Artist: Auguste Rodin (French, Paris 1840–1917 Meudon)

Founder: Cast by Georges Rudier (French)

Date: modeled ca. 1890, cast ca. 1967

Culture:  French

Medium: Bronze

Dimensions: Overall (wt. confirmed): 12 ½ × 12 × 9 in., 17.4 lb. (31.8 × 30.5 × 22.9 cm, 7.9 kg)

Classification: Sculpture-Bronze

Credit Line: Gift of Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, 1986

Accession Number: 1986.155.1 - The Metropolitan Museum of Art


Description and image from The Metropolitan Museum of Art : “Despair is one of the sculptor’s various meditations on human despondency. Body coiled inward, the figure fruitlessly strains against the force of her foot pushing into her hands. Her pose recalls Rodin’s studies of dancers, but here bodily movement, confined by a foursquare block, is doomed to remain self-contained and endlessly repetitive. Despair derives from the upper left door of The Gates of Hell.”


Artemis: See archive for more Rodin. A lot of Rodin. :)  HERE

Hopefully it all comes up in search  (problem with tags).



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Cupid and Psyche

Artist: Auguste Rodin (French, Paris 1840–1917 Meudon)

Date: before 1893

Culture: French

Medium: Marble

Dimensions: Overall (wt. confirmed): 30 × 24 × 48 in., 496 lb. (76.2 × 61 × 121.9 cm, 225 kg)

Credit Line: Gift of Thomas F. Ryan, 1910

Accession Number: 10.63.1 - The Metropolitan Museum of Art



Description and images from The Metropolitan Museum of Art  “In this variation on the theme of lost love, Rodin depicts the moment that the god Cupid abandons the mortal Psyche at the command of the jealous goddess Venus. Outstretched across a block of unfinished marble, Psyche desperately clings to the god as he lowers his face toward her and ascends with beating wings. The projecting marble strut supporting Cupid’s arm binds him to the block and locks the lovers in an eternal parting embrace. In 1893 Cupid and Psyche and Orpheus and Eurydice became Rodin’s first carved works to enter an American collection.”


Artemis: See archive for more Rodin. A lot of Rodin. :)  HERE

Hopefully it all comes up in search  (problem with tags).



January 09 2018

Few companies crush lapis lazuli in the paint to make it blue, and there aren’t too many canvases woven at the full moon by blind virgins drunk on sacramental wine

From The Worst Art Restoration Mistakes of All Time 

By Esther Inglis-Arkell, August 28, 2012 HERE

“When Materials Science Goes Wrong"

“One of the major problems with restoring art is the fact that the materials to do it just aren’t around anymore. Few companies crush lapis lazuli in the paint to make it blue, and there aren’t too many canvases woven at the full moon by blind virgins drunk on sacramental wine — or whatever they thought was appropriate to back religious paintings way back when. Once the materials are approximately re-created, they have to age the same way the rest of the painting does. When they don’t, things can go badly wrong.”


Artemis: Yeah,  they just don’t make them like they used to… 

Great line.  LOL



I am satisfied—I see, dance, laugh, sing…

Walt Whitman, from Song of Myself (Leaves of Grass)



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Isamu Noguchi, Grey Sun, 1967, Arni marble, Smithsonian American Art Museum, © The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, New York, Gift of the artist, 1969.158


Believing that sculpture should be “an equivalent for natural forms and forces,” Isamu Noguchi explored the sun’s vital power in this massive marble. He derived its shape from a millstone which, “inverted and elevated, becomes a sun-like image."  Smithsonian American Art Museum: Commemorative Guide. Nashville, TN: Beckon Books, 2015.



January 03 2018

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Meredith Frampton

Marguerite Kelsey

1928

Tate collection


ART WORDS: Verism, from Italian term ‘verismo’, is applied to paintings which represent scenes with a high degree of truth to appearance.

Tate.org.uk

December 26 2017

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December 13 2017

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December 12 2017

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